Yellow Press

Wikipedia / The free encyclopedia 

Tabloid journalism 
tends to emphasize topics such as sensational crime stories, astrology, gossip columns about the personal lives of celebrities and sports stars, and junk food news. Such journalism is commonly associated with tabloid sized newspapers like “The National Enquirer”, “Globe” or “The Daily Mail” and the former “News of the World.” The terms “tabloids”, “supermarket tabloids”, “gutter press”, and “rag”, refer to the journalistic approach of such newspapers rather than their size.[citation needed]

Often, tabloid newspaper allegations about the sexual practices, drug use, or private conduct of celebrities is borderline defamatory; in many cases, celebrities have successfully sued for libel, demonstrating that tabloid stories have defamed them. It is this sense of the word that led to some entertainment news programs to be called tabloid television

In the U.S. “supermarket tabloids” are large, national versions of these tabloids, usually published weekly. They are named for their prominent placement along the checkout lines of supermarkets. Supermarket tabloids are particularly notorious for the over-the-top sensationalizing of stories, the facts of which can often be called into question.[citation needed] These tabloids—such as The Globe andThe National Enquirer—often use aggressive and usually mean-spirited tactics to sell their issues. Unlike regular tabloid-format newspapers, supermarket tabloids are distributed through the magazine distribution channel, similarly to other weekly magazines and mass-market paperback books. Leading examples include The National EnquirerStarWeekly World News (now defunct), and Sun.

Most major supermarket tabloids in the U.S. are published by American Media, Inc., including The National EnquirerStarThe GlobeNational Examiner¡Mira!SunWeekly World News and Radar.

Wikipedia Org / English / Tabloid Journalism 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tabloid_journalism 

Yellow journalism, or the yellow press
is a type of journalism that presents little or no legitimate well-researched news and instead uses eye-catching headlines to sell more newspapers.[1] Techniques may include exaggerations of news events, scandal-mongering, orsensationalism.[1] By extension, the term yellow journalism is used today as a pejorative to decry any journalism that treats news in an unprofessional or unethical fashion.[2]

Campbell (2001) defines yellow press newspapers as having daily multi-column front-page headlines covering a variety of topics, such as sports and scandal, using bold layouts (with large illustrations and perhaps color), heavy reliance on unnamed sources, and unabashed self-promotion. The term was extensively used to describe certain major New York City newspapers about 1900 as they battled for circulation.

Frank Luther Mott (1941) defines yellow journalism in terms of five characteristics[3]:

  1. scare headlines in huge print, often of minor news
  2. lavish use of pictures, or imaginary drawings
  3. use of faked interviews, misleading headlines, pseudoscience, and a parade of false learning from so-called experts
  4. emphasis on full-color Sunday supplements, usually with comic strips
  5. dramatic sympathy with the “underdog” against the system.

YELLOW JOURNALISM 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_journalism 

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